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Michael Rielly

Foods to Try Before You Die

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Michael Rielly

Foods to Try Before You Die

October 19, 2009

Fox News - AskMen.com

by James Raiswell

EXCERPT:

There are some foods in the world that are simply too spectacular not to be tasted at least once over the course of a lifetime.

And while the most interesting culinary delicacies usually hail from remote locations in the farthest reaches of the globe, have no fear: We've sourced out a handful of the best delicacies and suggested exactly where you can enjoy these palatable treasures.

So, for the adventurous eater, here are our picks for the foods to try before you die.

Fried Spider (Cambodia)

0_21_spider450.jpg

Is this a cure for arachnophobia? Probably not, but in the remote town of Skuon, Cambodia, fried spiders are served as daily delicacies and are known to be among the best in the world.

The spiders (a species known locally as "a-ping," which are about the size of your palm) are bred in holes in the ground or captured in the wild and killed. The spider is then breaded in a mixture of MSG, sugar and salt, and fried in oil with chopped garlic until the legs turn rigid, at which point the meat in the abdomen is no longer runny.

...

Fugu (Japan)

What's not to love about a poisonous fish? You've probably heard stories about the inherently lethal qualities of this exotic Japanese delicacy, and we're here to tell you that these stories are all true. The Japanese blowfish (or fugu) is so deadly that a misstep in the preparation can release a poison into the meat that is 1,200 times more deadly than cyanide; each fish contains enough poison to kill 30 adults.

...

Century Egg (China)

Rest assured this name is a bit of an exaggeration. While these particular Chinese-style eggs have been preserved for periods of time ranging between weeks and months, none are kept for as long as 100 years.

...

Odori Ebi (Japan)

A much safer Japanese delicacy (at least as far as the eater is concerned) than fugu is odori ebi, which roughly translated means “living” or “dancing prawn.” Odori ebi is a type of sushi that still contains live baby prawns that wiggle their antennae and legs as you eat them.

...

SOURCE

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Michael Rielly

One down, three to go! :D

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Eileen Strom

Ah..to me it should be named "Foods to DIE For". Or, "You'd wish you'd died before you tried". :sc_rofl:

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Michael Rielly
Ah..to me it should be named "Foods to DIE For". Or, "You'd wish you'd died before you tried". :sc_rofl:

Don't knock it unless you've tried it! ;)

I LOVE sushi! But at one point I was never going to eat it. Finally a friend of mine said to me, "Have you ever had it?"

"Ewwe raw fish?! No way!" I think was my answer.

"Well if you've never had it how do you know you do not like it? What are you four years old?" was his reply.

And guess what!? I loved it! I also learned that sushi is not just raw fish. It is a 'style' of food preparation. There are lots of 'sushi' dishes that are cooked or have no fish at all!

Ever since then I have a rule that I will try everything twice. Why two times and not only once? Imagine if you've never had Italian food before and the first time you try it it is Chef-Boy-Arde? You may like it or you may not. But then you come over to my house and I make you the same dish and it is 100 times better or worse depending on your particular tastes.

On the list above, I have tried Century Egg sometimes referred to as 'Thousand Year Old Egg'. Both times I had it was in China. Both times I hated it. But I can say I tried it! ;)

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FrSanta

FUGU ME FUGU ME... yum.

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Carlo Klemm

May I add one. Can't say I have tried this but others have.......definition from Wikipedia

Rocky Mountain oysters, also known as prairie oysters, are a North American culinary name for edible offal, specifically buffalo or bull testicles. They are usually peeled, coated in flour, pepper and salt, sometimes pounded flat, then deep-fried. This delicacy is most often served as an appetizer.[1]

It is a well-known novelty dish in parts of the American West and the Canadian Prairies where cattle ranching is prevalent and castration of young animals is common ("prairie oysters" is the preferred name in Canada, where they may be served in a demi-glace, not deep-fried).[2] In Oklahoma and North Texas, they are sometimes called calf fries but only if taken from very young bulls.[3] In Spain and many parts of Mexico they are referred to as "criadillas" and are colloquially referred to as huevos del toro (literally, "bull's eggs" but huevos is also a Spanish slang term for testicles) in Central and South America.[4] Rocky Mountain oysters are sometimes confused with lamb fries or animelles (lamb testicles), which are served in a manner similar to Rocky Mountain oysters. A few other descriptive terms, such as "cowboy caviar," "Montana tendergroins," or "swinging beef," may be used.[5]

The dish, purportedly cowboy fare,[6] is most commonly found served at festivals, such as the ones in Montana and Phoenix, Arizona, amongst ranching families, or at certain specialty eating establishments and bars.[5] Eagle, Idaho, claims to have the "World's Largest Rocky Mountain Oyster Feed" during its Eagle Fun Days (typically the first weekend in June).[7] Usually this meat product is sold frozen, as it is inconvenient to get them fresh.[8][9]

The primary goal of testicle removal is not necessarily culinary. Castration in veterinary practice and animal husbandry is common and serves a variety of purposes, including the control of breeding, the growth of skeletal muscle suitable for beef, and temperament alteration.[10]

180px-Testicoli.jpg

Pictures from an Italian market

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Michael Rielly
FUGU ME FUGU ME... yum.

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I love the pamphlet!

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Laffo

I have had them all so far.

Mountain Oysters in Wyoming,

Spiders, and other insects in NYC,

Fugu in Portland,

Century Egg her in Atlanta, I've also had a Black Century Duck Egg which is an egg of a different color and ammonia content,

and Odori Ebi in San Fransico.

The best yet was Sea Grub Tacos, right at the Mexican Border, and Roasted Iguana in Puerto Rico just outside the Aracibo.

I also love Beef Tendon and Fat Net Pho.

The same place that has the Eggs also has an awesome chicken foot.

We have a great road called Buford Highway and you could eat on it for days.

I had a Jagermeister Donut at VooDoo Donut in Portland.

Laffo.

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Santa Craig Wilson

I guess that I'm either too old (60) or too

square but I must say, with apologies to Howie Mandel, NO DEAL!!!!!!!!!! :yucky:

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Iowa Santa Claus

Nothing wrong with rocky mountion oysters. I've had turkey, piglet , never tryed calf fries yet.

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SantaJoe
I have had them all so far.

Mountain Oysters in Wyoming,

Spiders, and other insects in NYC,

Fugu in Portland,

Century Egg her in Atlanta, I've also had a Black Century Duck Egg which is an egg of a different color and ammonia content,

and Odori Ebi in San Fransico.

The best yet was Sea Grub Tacos, right at the Mexican Border, and Roasted Iguana in Puerto Rico just outside the Aracibo.

I also love Beef Tendon and Fat Net Pho.

The same place that has the Eggs also has an awesome chicken foot.

We have a great road called Buford Highway and you could eat on it for days.

I had a Jagermeister Donut at VooDoo Donut in Portland.

Laffo.

Not as long as my local grocery store sells beef, chicken, turkey, fish, pork (traditional) . I mean look at me, do I need another food to love!

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Santa Robert in KC

Laffo, You should have Zimmerman from Bizarre Foods on the Travel Channel to come visit you at your business.. He's done fair foods so your's would fit right in!

Would be fun to see both of you eating foods that are not familiar to us, but commonly eaten in other countries. Protein is were you find it!

I've eaten toasted meal worms, roasted grasshoppers (remove the jumping legs first!) and

ants. Science City in Kansas City has had a Bug Chef in and he fixed all kinds of insects for

everyone to taste!

Oh... and any good oriental grocery has 100 year eggs for sale!

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VetteCitySanta

I have always wondered why, Laffo, you have that bug-eyed look in your photo. Now I know. Mystery solved. Bon appetit.

VCS :D

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Kris Claus

And people think I am gross for liking tripe, chicken gizzards and hearts. :huh:

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Santa-MD

I haven't had anything in the article, with the possible exception of the Century Egg (while living in Taiwan 88-89). I ate a number of other interesting things there. I first had 'escargot' there, but had Rocky Mountain Oysters in France. Stinky Tofu is also very popular in Taiwan; it smells really bad, but the flavor is not as bad as the stench. I've had some interesting food living in Japan, but not Odori Ebi. Try some Natto when there. It is rotten tofu. They can't get enough of the stuff, like Aussies with Vegemite. Hmm, so there is something I like less than natto. . . ;)

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Santa Pirate

YUCK.... I mean Arrg! i have digested some things while in the ARMY oversea that are to disgusting to mention...I'll stick to regular fare..unless the food interests me.........LOL :sc_eat:

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