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The promise of Christmas: Why we still celebrate the birth of Jesus 2,000 years after it happened

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The promise of Christmas: Why we still celebrate the birth of Jesus 2,000 years after it happened

By Dr. David Jeremiah | Fox News

December 25, 2018

Why do we still celebrate the birth of Jesus 2,000 years later?

Let’s take it one step further: Why has humanity held out this event as supremely important for even thousands of years before that?

Before you assume I’ve simply forgotten what year it is, in order to understand what I mean we must understand just how long the road history, and all of creation for that matter, has journeyed to get us to this point in the first place.

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LINK:     https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/the-promise-of-christmas-why-we-still-celebrate-the-birth-of-jesus-2000-years-after-it-happened

Edited by Michael Rielly
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Tommy

This was very good!! Thanks for posting it.

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