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Woman who complained about ‘pink’ turkey


Rob Thompson
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(I know this is a bit late but definitely worth a share :) )

Woman who complained about ‘pink’ turkey 
Source = Metro
By - Sabrina Johnson
Date - 29 Dec 2021

Woman who complained about 'pink' turkey actually bought gammon
The woman eventually gave up serving the meat because it was still too pink 
Christmas can be a stressful time in the kitchen, but when one woman’s ‘turkey’ refused to cook it turned out to be an embarrassing case of mistaken identity.

PRC_216619740.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&z

The woman, known as Zoe, contacted NL Woodcock Butchers in Oldham, Greater Manchester, saying she had been left ‘very disappointed’ after cooking what she thought was a 12lb turkey.

She told the butcher she had been forced to put the bird back in the oven as when she carved it, the meat was ‘still very, very pink’.

Zoe kept cooking the so-called turkey but ‘gave-up’ two hours later, serving Christmas dinner meatless as it was still pink.


She then went back into the kitchen to ‘nibble’ on the ‘now very dry meat’ only to realise it was gammon.

Her message read: ‘So we cooked the big 12lb turkey yesterday and when we carved it was still very, very pink inside so we had to put it back in the oven.

‘One hour later we got it back out again but still pink my husband carved it and all and put it back in because we thought it would cook quicker like this.

‘Eventually, we gave up and had Christmas dinner two hours late with no meat.

‘Very disappointed I have to say.’

Meae to the butcher: -

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However, when she told the butcher of her disappointment, he pointed out she had ordered a Christmas hamper that didn’t come with a turkey.

Neil the butcher replied: ‘Hi Zoe we are sorry about that but looking at your previous messages you ordered the hamper 6 which was the full gammon joint and didn’t come with a turkey.’

Realising her mistake, Zoe apologised and asked if there were any turkeys left.

Fortunately, the butcher saw the funny side and offered to give Zoe a turkey crown free of charge.

Neil said: ‘We will drop you a boneless turkey breast on Wednesday.

‘The price is nothing as it’s the best laugh I’ve had this year. Hope all the family get well soon.’

A screenshot of the exchange between the customer and the butcher
The butchers offered Zoe a turkey crown free of charge (Picture: Facebook)
The butchers later shared the exchange on Facebook, writing: ‘Looking after our customers. Sorry, Zoe but we thought it was funny.’

And the exchange has certainly made others chuckle with customers calling the mishap ‘priceless’ and ‘absolutely brilliant’.

Others credited Zoe for ‘being a great sport’ about it all and thanked her for the laugh.

Zoe later commented: ‘I’m so pleased everyone has had such a massive laugh at our stupidity.’

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Im guessing she never went to Spec Savers and her sense of smell and taste had gone on vacation  :) 

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Great article Rob. Fun read. There are usually little mishaps that occur with a annual grand scale meal, but this one takes the cake. Thanks for sharing

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Posted (edited)

Great read, Rob. Thanks! Nonetheless, while y'all are laughing a little, I'm over here struck by the tragedy of it all! Christmas with no meat! Oh, the humanity! 🤣

1 hour ago, Rob Thompson said:

Zoe kept cooking the so-called turkey but ‘gave-up’ two hours later, serving Christmas dinner meatless as it was still pink.

1 hour ago, Rob Thompson said:

‘Eventually, we gave up and had Christmas dinner two hours late with no meat.

Really, though, this whole article is hilarious! Reminds me of this . . .

See the source image

Edited by Sundblom Santa
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3 hours ago, Sundblom Santa said:

Really, though, this whole article is hilarious! Reminds me of this . . .

See the source image

That's how we do it in the country...we don't know what a pink center is

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Biggest question is? How do not notice how different they look?

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I'm guessing from the photo that gammon is smoked ham.  Our first turkey as newlyweds, my sister made tea and instead of turning off the burner, she turned off the oven... it was the latest Christmas dinner we ever had.

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12 hours ago, Black River Santa said:

I'm guessing from the photo that gammon is smoked ham. 

I have to admit that I didn't know what gammon is and asked my wife, and she didn't know either. So, I looked up the definition, which also included a picture, and it makes sense. We do love it. It's not called gammon in my neighborhood, but I love learning new, (or old) things on ClausNet. Thanks again Robbie

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1 hour ago, Santa Craig Maxwell said:

I have to admit that I didn't know what gammon is and asked my wife, and she didn't know either. So, I looked up the definition, which also included a picture, and it makes sense. We do love it. It's not called gammon in my neighborhood, but I love learning new, (or old) things on ClausNet. Thanks again Robbie

Miss Mowcher uses the term "gammon and spinach" in Dickens' David Copperfield and Jack Warner, as Mr. Jorkin, in the 1951 adaptation of A Christmas Carol, Scrooge, with Alistair Sim, uses it when talking to young Ebeneezer. I think it means "nonsense" or "baloney" in American terms but @Rob Thompson would know for sure. I'm a big Dickens fan and knew what spinach was but never took the time to look up gammon. You learn something new everyday.

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18 minutes ago, Black River Santa said:

Miss Mowcher uses the term "gammon and spinach" in Dickens' David Copperfield and Jack Warner, as Mr. Jorkin, in the 1951 adaptation of A Christmas Carol, Scrooge, with Alistair Sim, uses it when talking to young Ebeneezer. I think it means "nonsense" or "baloney" in American terms but @Rob Thompson would know for sure. I'm a big Dickens fan and knew what spinach was but never took the time to look up gammon. You learn something new everyday.

I think in the movie context he means its ok or no harm done, The phrase became more popular in very recent years to describe someone as angry eg Gammon Faced today. :) 

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45 minutes ago, Rob Thompson said:

The phrase became more popular in very recent years to describe someone as angry eg Gammon Faced today.

Back to the thread; gammon is referring to the full gammon joint included in the hamper 6 order. whew! No wonder English is considered a hard language to learn. Still, a fun read Rob, knowwhatImean?

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Posted (edited)
21 minutes ago, Santa Craig Maxwell said:

Back to the thread; gammon is referring to the full gammon joint included in the hamper 6 order. whew! No wonder English is considered a hard language to learn. Still, a fun read Rob, knowwhatImean?

What do you call gammon over there? Its a regular on the Pub Grub mens, with egg and Pineapple.  Im not overly keen on it as it is very salty. :) 

 

gammon-steak-if-you-like.jpg

Edited by Rob Thompson
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23 minutes ago, Rob Thompson said:

What do you call gammon over there?

Ham. I'm not overly fond of it either, it is usually salty. The dish in your picture would be ordered as Ham and egg, with fries, & peas, the pineapple garnish is complementary to help sweeten the salty ham. 

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4 hours ago, Rob Thompson said:

What do you call gammon over there? Its a regular on the Pub Grub mens, with egg and Pineapple.  Im not overly keen on it as it is very salty. :) 

According the BBC's "Good Food," (www.bbcgoodfood.com) "Both gammon and ham are cuts from the hind legs of a pig. Gammon is sold raw and ham is sold ready-to-eat. Gammon has been cured in the same way as bacon, whereas ham has been dry-cured or cooked. Once you've cooked your gammon, it's then called ham."

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4 hours ago, Santa Craig Maxwell said:

Ham. I'm not overly fond of it either, it is usually salty. . . the pineapple garnish is complementary to help sweeten the salty ham.

Our family also adds pineapple to our hams, to help sweeten the meat and remove some of the saltiness. Of course, we always get our hams "bone-in" (as the saying goes). The tenderness is out-of-this-world! It's delicious! Nothing beats a good homecooked bone-in-ham. Yum! Except maybe adding the peas right on top of the homemade mashed potatoes, all of it smothered in ham gravy (not out of a package, but right off the bone)! And who can forget all of the sides?! :sc_drool2: 

Hey, one thing Santa's know how to do is eat (even if we don't all have natural padding)! Of course, Mrs. Claus knows how to feed us. "Whoever heard of a skinny Santa?! Eat! Eat!" (Mrs. Claus, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, Rankin-Bass, 1964). 🤣

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6 hours ago, Santa Craig Maxwell said:

Ham. I'm not overly fond of it either, it is usually salty. The dish in your picture would be ordered as Ham and egg, with fries, & peas, the pineapple garnish is complementary to help sweeten the salty ham. 

Then you haver never had my Dr Pepper fig-glazed ham.

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Posted (edited)
35 minutes ago, Felix Estridge said:

Then you haver never had my Dr Pepper fig-glazed ham.

While I've never cared for Dr. Pepper, I love ham (especially a good bone-in ham). I may just need to try some. Dang it, Felix! You're contributing to Santa's growing waistline! :sc_eat:

Edited by Sundblom Santa
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2 hours ago, Felix Estridge said:

Then you haver never had my Dr Pepper fig-glazed ham.

Sounds fantastic

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4 hours ago, Felix Estridge said:

Then you haver never had my Dr Pepper fig-glazed ham.

I always find Gammon to be to salty for me, starts me coughing.

By the way, this happened in Oldham, Lancashire. I was born and raised there.

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7 hours ago, Felix Estridge said:

Then you haver never had my Dr Pepper fig-glazed ham.

My daughter cooks it in Coca cola, sounds disgusting, but it does have a pleasant taste to it :)

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10 hours ago, Felix Estridge said:

Then you haver never had my Dr Pepper fig-glazed ham.

on my way over

10 hours ago, Sundblom Santa said:

While I've never cared for Dr. Pepper, I love ham (especially a good bone-in ham). I may just need to try some. Dang it, Felix! You're contributing to Santa's growing waistline! :sc_eat:

then you have never had TX (Dublin) Dr. Pepper !

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9 hours ago, Cliff Cringle said:

I always find Gammon to be to salty for me, starts me coughing.

By the way, this happened in Oldham, Lancashire. I was born and raised there.

Maybe you should try it where you live now, you might not cough lol :)

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/22/2022 at 8:16 PM, Felix Estridge said:

Then you haver never had my Dr Pepper fig-glazed ham.

Nor My bourbon glazed version. 

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3 minutes ago, YoungSC said:

 

 

3 minutes ago, YoungSC said:

Nor My bourbon glazed version. 

YoungSC, I'd expect no less from the Eggnog King

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