Jump to content

Christmas canceled: Parents and media go after holiday traditions


Drosselmeyer
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Moderator

Christmas canceled: Parents and media go after holiday traditions, 'It’s getting annoying'

Parents, media and entertainment figures are criticizing many of the classic traditions behind Christmas

Published December 9, 2022 2:00am EST

Santa-istock.jpg?ve=1&tl=1

 

With the holidays quickly approaching, parents, media figures and the entertainment industry are criticizing many of the traditions behind Christmas. 

Even Santa himself has come under fire. Some Gen Z parents aren’t allowing their children to believe he is real, as evidenced by the hashtag #santaisntreal which has received nearly 19M views on TikTok. Many parents cite concerns that once their children find out Santa’s magic is a myth, they’ll be "traumatized."

Mother Sierra McKenzie went viral for a video she posted to TikTok stating she wouldn’t be "lying to them [her kids] about Santa," nor would she be taking them for pictures with Santa or including any presents under the tree from St. Nick."Telling kids that Santa is real is a lie, and I don’t believe in building my kids up on a lie," McKenzie told the New York Post. "Your kids can still enjoy the magic of Christmas without believing in Santa."

Another mom, Chloe Amelle, said she also won’t be label presents as "from Santa" under her tree, because she doesn’t like "the idea of lieing [sic]" to her kids or worrying they would get "’better’ things from Santa than other kids," according to her TikTok. 

Another mother and family writer, Laura Jackel, penned a piece for MamaMia in which she detailed the six Christmas traditions she was planning on canceling this year. 

"Do my kids actually want to wear the matching festive pyjamas?" she asked. "Do I care to traipse around the shops searching for nice ones in their size so they can take part in this weird tradition sponsored by capitalism?"

Jackel also said she plans to ditch Elf on the Shelf this year and suggests parents tell their kids that "Santa recalled your elf to help with present sorting or that it... died." 

Other Christmas traditions she plans to cancel include "sending cards to anyone outside immediate family," "the forced Santa photo," and "purchasing festive snacks." 

Fox News contributor Joe Concha said he never expected parents to open a new front in the "War on Christmas … in the name of virtue signaling."  

"And thanks to the media and woke corporations, we’re stuck with this constant barrage of political correctness, and it’s getting annoying," he added. 

Other targets of the Christmas backlash include reboots of classic shows and movies. 

NBC News culture critic Ani Bundel criticized Apple TVs "Spirited" and Netflix’s "Scrooge: A Christmas Carol" for the shows’ "insistence on preaching this secular myth of the billionaire turned benefactor at a time when the news is full of stories to the contrary" which indicates "both musical adaptations hit the wrong key."

"In a year when it seems nearly every monopolistic company is laying off workers, the cathartic comeuppance of a hard-hearted billionaire makes cultural sense," she added. "But neither film is willing to even admit its cruel corporate czar is a bad person, as if the producers fear insulting the rich men who run their respective streaming services." 

The new Disney+ series "The Santa Clauses," which is a reprisal of The Santa Clause movies, stars conservative actor Tim Allen, who has been criticized over a line in the show where Santa says, "Saying Merry Christmas to all has suddenly become problematic!"The line from Allen’s character prompted a Twitter firestorm after filmmaker Scott Weinberg called the line a "truly weird thing to put in a kid's series."

"[It's] not some random campaign. it's a low-key effort to vilify anyone who doesn't celebrate this holiday," Weinberg tweeted. "in a grown-up movie I'd just groan and ignore it."

Twitter users were also quick to call out Democrat Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers for referring to the state’s Christmas tree as the "2022 Capitol Holiday Tree." 

Governor Kathy Hochul received similar backlash last year when she referred to the state’s capital Christmas tree as a "holiday tree." 

This isn’t the first year Christmas shows and traditions have come under fire. A long-running debate about the classic Christmas song, "Baby, It's Cold Outside," has garnered more attention in recent years amid the #MeToo movement.  

Many critics believe the song implies date-rape, citing lyrics like "Say, what's in this drink?," "Ya mind if I move in closer?" and "Gosh your lips look delicious."

In 2019, John Legend and Kelly Clarkson collaborated on an updated "PC" rewrite of the song, swapping the original lyrics for lines like "It’s your body and your choice" and "I want you to stay, it’s not up to me."

  • Angry 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Don't Tread On Me" is the proper response to this nonsense 

  • Love 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you do not want to, that is fine, but why attempt to purposely damage the hearts and minds of others by spoiling the magic of Christmas for so many. I agree "Don't tread on me!"

  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Black Hills Santa said:

"Don't Tread On Me" is the proper response to this nonsense

2 hours ago, Santa SteveKl said:

If you do not want to, that is fine, but why attempt to purposely damage the hearts and minds of others by spoiling the magic of Christmas for so many. I agree "Don't tread on me!"

I really wish I had a wife and children so we could share the story of Santa, wear ugly sweaters, give to the less fortunate, trim the Christmas tree, take as many photos with Santa (and each other) as we can, drink eggnog, eat unhealthy, wear matching pajamas, wish our family, friends, and neighbors (and even so-called enemies) a “Merry Christmas,” belt out Christmas carols, watch Christmas movies, and send out lots of Christmas cards (maybe even to random strangers). In short, seeking to love our neighbors as ourselves.

Heck, I’d even be willing to sing “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” with my (future) wife in public. In short, don’t tread on me. If it’s not something you’d like to do, that’s fine, but don’t seek to take away anyone else’s enjoyment of the Christmas holiday season.

  • Like 1
  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well my foot is itching again!!!!  :( 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Because you don't wish to participate, doesn't mean that you get to impose your beliefs on everyone else. I'm so tired of sanctimonious people forcing what believe in on everyone else, I'm going to sic Krampus on them.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

42 minutes ago, Grandpa Gus said:

Because you don't wish to participate, doesn't mean that you get to impose your beliefs on everyone else. I'm so tired of sanctimonious people forcing what believe in on everyone else

New England Puritans and radical leftists—not so different when you think about it.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My children enjoy seeing Santa. They’ve never been told to sit on his lap or give him a hug. They will if they want and Santa will respect their choice. 
PJs, snacks and the rest are all personal traditions people can do or not. Some people just don’t see the value in them and that’s fine. 
I do wonder how Christian families handle the talk of “Wait, if Santa isn’t real than is Jesus?” Seems like a hard one. 
All in all, people on every side will always think they know what is best for everyone’s kids and it’s our job as parents to patiently, and lovingly, teach our kids to think critically and for themselves. 
I know I believe in Santa and Mrs. Claus and I will never have to have the “isn't real” talk. My kids know there are non believers. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, AsaClaus said:

My children enjoy seeing Santa. They’ve never been told to sit on his lap or give him a hug. They will if they want and Santa will respect their choice.
PJs, snacks and the rest are all personal traditions people can do or not. Some people just don’t see the value in them and that’s fine.

And no child should be. Santa Claus will always respect a child's choice. I hope no one here would ever suggest otherwise. My point is that some people feeling a certain way about select cultural practices around Christmas hopefully doesn't mean they desire to force them on others. What a lot of us don't like is for someone to tell us we can't do something that doesn't negatively affect anybody else.

If you'd like, you can consult standard Christian texts on the value of individuals honoring and respecting the personal consciences of others (e.g., Rom. 14:1ff; 1 Cor. 8:1ff; 10:25-30). We don't desire (or shouldn't desire) to force anything on anyone. Yet, at the same time, we should be free to enjoy all of the good things the world has to offer, and which God has given to us (Christmas, and things associated with it, among them).

2 hours ago, AsaClaus said:

I do wonder how Christian families handle the talk of “Wait, if Santa isn’t real than is Jesus?” Seems like a hard one. 

I'm not sure whether or not I should laugh at that statement. I mean absolutely no offense, my dear brother, but if parents (not meaning children) feel threatened by Santa Claus (or the Tooth Fairy, the Easter bunny, storybooks, fairytales, pretend, make-believe, circus clowns, imagination, fun, and so forth), their problem isn't with Christ and God. It's with themselves.

Never mind that (1) I've never heard a child ever say such a thing (and supposed anecdotes aren't evidence, so let's not anybody go there) and (2) non-belief in the Creator of the Universe is purposeful and premeditated rank rebellion against God and is punishable by Divine wrath in both this life and in the next (Rom. 1:18-32). The vast majority (read: non-fundamentalist) Christian families allow their children to believe in Santa Claus (as I personally feel they should). It doesn't negatively impact those children (or the vast majority of children raised by secular parents, or parents of other religions, for that matter). At the same time, though, I'm also not going to appease fundamentalists or their counterparts, the village atheists (and, yes, that's a little play on the phrase "village idiot," if anyone's wondering—I certainly don’t mean anyone here) just because they seek to intimidate parents or children to go in any one direction (anti-Santa or anti-God, or anything else for that matter). People have to be free to make their own decisions (which includes allowing their children to believe in Santa Claus).

2 hours ago, AsaClaus said:

All in all, people on every side will always think they know what is best for everyone’s kids and it’s our job as parents to patiently, and lovingly, teach our kids to think critically and for themselves. 
I know I believe in Santa and Mrs. Claus and I will never have to have the “isn't real” talk. My kids know there are non believers. 

Major props for being a wonderful father. I'm sure some of us have heard too many stories of abusive or absentee "fathers" (and I use that word loosely). Parents need to be patient and loving. If they're not, such negligent, abusive behaviors will affect their children (whether they think it will or not). Children have to know they're loved.

Edited by Sundblom Santa
  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, Sundblom Santa said:

And no child should be. Santa Claus will always respect a child's choice. I hope no one here would ever suggest otherwise. My point is that some people feeling a certain way about select cultural practices around Christmas hopefully doesn't mean they desire to force them on others. What a lot of us don't like is for someone to tell us we can't do something that doesn't negatively affect anybody else.

If you'd like, you can consult standard Christian texts on the value of individuals honoring and respecting the personal consciences of others (e.g., Rom. 14:1ff; 1 Cor. 8:1ff; 10:25-30). We don't desire (or shouldn't desire) to force anything on anyone. Yet, at the same time, we should be free to enjoy all of the good things the world has to offer, and which God has given to us (Christmas, and things associated with it, among them).

I'm not sure whether or not I should laugh at that statement. I mean absolutely no offense, my dear brother, but if parents (not meaning children) feel threatened by Santa Claus (or the Tooth Fairy, the Easter bunny, storybooks, fairytales, pretend, make-believe, circus clowns, imagination, fun, and so forth), their problem isn't with Christ and God. It's with themselves.

Never mind that (1) I've never heard a child ever say such a thing (and supposed anecdotes aren't evidence, so let's not anybody go there) and (2) non-belief in the Creator of the Universe is purposeful and premeditated rank rebellion against God and is punishable by Divine wrath in both this life and in the next (Rom. 1:18-32). The vast majority (read: non-fundamentalist) Christian families allow their children to believe in Santa Claus (as I personally feel they should). It doesn't negatively impact those children (or the vast majority of children raised by secular parents, or parents of other religions, for that matter). At the same time, though, I'm also not going to appease fundamentalists or their counterparts, the village atheists (and, yes, that's a little play on the phrase "village idiot," if anyone's wondering—I certainly don’t mean anyone here) just because they seek to intimidate parents or children to go in any one direction (anti-Santa or anti-God, or anything else for that matter). People have to be free to make their own decisions (which includes allowing their children to believe in Santa Claus).

Major props for being a wonderful father. I'm sure some of us have heard too stories of many abusive or absentee "fathers" (and I use that word loosely). Parents need to be patient and loving. If they're not, such negligent, abusive behaviors will affect their children (whether they think it will or not). Children have to know they're loved.

As always my brother in red, I truly appreciate your insight and kindness!

  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

🎄 COUNTDOWN TO CHRISTMAS

  • Days
  • Hours
  • Minutes
  • Seconds

  • Donations

    All donations go directly towards the cost of hosting and running ClausNet!

    Your support, through donations or simply by clicking on sponsor links, is greatly appreciated!

    Donate Sidebar by DevFuse
  • Our picks

    • How do You Portray Santa?
      Portraying Santa is acting; it is a characterization of a mythical character.

      Most of us never think of ourselves as actors, but we are. Certain characteristics of Santa Claus have been handed down from one generation to another. The way we dress and conduct ourselves all follow an established pattern.

      Santa Claus is one of the most recognizable characters throughout the world. This came about from the advertising campaign of the Coke Cola Company and the creative painting genius, of Haddon Sundblom. Coke Cola was looking to increase winter sales of its soft drink and hired Sundblom to produce illustrations for prominent magazines. These illustrations appeared during the holiday season from the late 1930s into the early 1970s and set the standard for how Santa should look.

      This characterization of Santa with rosy cheeks, a white beard, handlebar mustache plus a red costume trimmed in white fur is the image most everyone has in their minds. Unconsciously people are going to judge you against that image. If your beard isn’t white or you have a soiled suit it will register with the onlooker.

      By the way, the majority of Sundblom's paintings depict Santa with a Brown Belt and Brown Boots. Not until his later illustrations did he change the color to Black for these items. Within the past few years many costume companies have offered the Coke Cola Suit and it has become very popular. You can tell it by the large buttons and absence of fur down the front of the jacket.

      No matter how you portray Santa, be it home visits, schools, churches, parades, corporate events, malls, hospitals we all make an entrance and an impression! The initial impression we make determines if our client will ask us to return.

      The 5 Second Rule

      I have a theory: When you enter the presence of your audience you have about 5 seconds to make people believe you are the real Santa.
        • Thanks
        • Love
        • Like
      • 14 replies
    • If You Have the Post Christmas Blues You’re Doing Christmas Wrong
      The post-Christmas blues are a very real thing. Once the date of December 25th has passed the specter of December 26th is an ominous marker to many. It sits there on the calendar like the Ghost of Christmas Yet-to-Come. Silent and foreboding, the very image of the hooded Angel of Death it seems to be. And why not?

      Just about anywhere you look Americans are tossing trees to the curb, ripping down lights from rooftops and radio stations are flipping back to everyday music. What took months to build gets deconstructed in a matter of a couple of days.
        • Love
        • Like
      • 30 replies
    • Not Everyone Can Be Santa!
      Yes, I said it and it is not meant to hurt anyone’s feelings. I do view many Facebook sites along with websites and posted photos. Frankly, many of these postings should have never been put on public display.
        • Thanks
        • Love
        • Like
      • 9 replies
    • Auld Lang Syne
      Every New Year’s Eve at the stroke of midnight, millions around the world traditionally gather together to sing the same song, “Auld Lang Syne”. As revilers mumble though the song’s versus, it often brings many of them to tears – regardless of the fact that most don’t know or even understand the lyrics. Confusion over the song’s lyrics is almost as much of a tradition as the song itself. Of course that rarely stops anyone from joining in.
        • Wow
        • Thanks
        • Love
        • Like
      • 4 replies
    • Merry Christmas, My Friend
      Every year around this time, some variation of this poem is circulated online. The poem is generally credited to “a soldier stationed in Okinawa” or more recently since September 11, 2001, “a Marine stationed in Afghanistan”.

      However, the poem’s true author is Lance Corporal James M. Schmidt.

      Originally entitled, “Merry Christmas, My Friend”, Corporal Schmidt wrote the poem in 1986 while serving as Battalion Counter Sniper at the Marine Barracks 8th & I, in Washington, D.C.

      That day the poem was placed in the Marine Corps Gazette and distributed worldwide. Schmidt’s poem was later published in Leatherneck (Magazine of the Marines) in December 1991.
        • Sad
        • Love
        • Like
      • 1 reply
×
×
  • Create New...