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'Baby, It's Cold Outside': The song's origins, controversial interpretations and what it means for dating


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'Baby, It's Cold Outside': The song's origins, controversial interpretations and what it means for dating

FOX NEWS     Published December 24, 2022 5:15pm EST

A deep dive into the Christmas classic and the debate about its lyrics — music and mental health professionals weigh in

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Four years after social media debate around the Christmas song "Baby, It’s Cold Outside" led to the tune’s paused radio play at select stations, the song still seems to be interpreted differently by listeners.

Broadway songwriter Frank Loesser penned the 78-year-old song. It made its unplanned silver screen debut in 1949 with "Neptune’s Daughter," a romantic comedy musical released by MGM Studios, according to leading actress Esther Williams.

"Baby, It’s Cold Outside" replaced the song "I'd Love to Get You (On a Slow Boat to China)," another song Loesser purposely wrote for "Neptune’s Daughter." But that song didn’t pass MGM censors because it was deemed too suggestive, Williams told The New York Times in 1999.

"Neptune’s Daughter" makes no references to Christmas and instead follows the story of two sisters who fall in love with a polo player and masseur, respectively; but "Baby, It’s Cold Outside" went on to become a Christmas classic after winning an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1950.

 

The duet has been recreated and performed by countless fans over the decades. Approximately 475 professional renditions exist, according to SecondHandSongs, an online song cover database.

Despite the enduring popularity of "Baby, It’s Cold Outside," the song hasn’t escaped scrutiny.

Pop culture critics, commentators, authors and social activists have questioned whether the song’s lyrics encourage sexual harassment and minimize consent with one half of the duet, "the wolf," insisting that the other, "the mouse," stay the night instead of leaving, according to several reports.

Lyrically, the mouse repeatedly tries to deny and resist the wolf’s advances, though the tonality of the performers seemingly suggests there’s playfulness in the duet.

Critics have argued that the wolf’s insistence and the presence of alcohol are factors that can pressure the mouse and impair her judgment.

 

Detractors are particularly uncomfortable with the mouse’s questioning line, "Say, what’s in this drink?" in the wake of #MeToo, a social movement against sexual harassment, sexual abuse and rape culture. It gained attention after celebrities and high-profile industry leaders shared their experiences in Hollywood and the labor force.

In 2018, radio stations throughout the U.S. announced that they would refrain from playing "Baby, It’s Cold Outside" after some listeners expressed concerns.

Cleveland radio station Star102 FM/WDOK announced that it had ditched the song after receiving listener feedback, as did Denver radio station KOSI 101.1 and San Francisco radio station KOIT 96.5; but the latter two reversed their decisions after polling listeners on social media, according to several reports.

Read the rest here:     https://www.foxnews.com/lifestyle/baby-its-cold-outside-songs-origins-controversial-interpretations-what-means-dating

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I do think the pushiness and the line “say what’s in this drink?” are exactly what detractors think it to mean.

I think being pushy and making light of practices we consider abhorrent now were just a difference of the times. 

Does that mean I listen to it less? No. It’s a good song and it’s just a song—I don’t bring the weight of every lyric into my enjoyment of it.

It wouldn’t be the first song nor the last that I enjoy that has dark or less than savory undertones. The song “Me vs. Maradona vs. Elvis” by the band Brand New is a song released in 2003 that is precisely about the same pushiness with women and alcohol.

It’s an amazing song with amazing lyrics and yeah it makes me feel uneasy but that’s the point. Not everything has to be about the best side of humanity.  

Edited by SantaTommy
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Don't Tread On Me...or my music.

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Fail Charlie Brown GIF by Peanuts

Maybe one day, 
Things will make sense?
Maybe ONE DAY 

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8 hours ago, Schwindy said:

Fail Charlie Brown GIF by Peanuts

Maybe one day, 
Things will make sense?
Maybe ONE DAY 

Agree, the day Lucy let's him kick it, it will make sense

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People really have to lighten up. The song absolutely does not have anything whatsoever to do with abuse. It’s just a Christmas song (meant to be sung by a couple, or a man and a woman, as a duet)—nothing more.

Edited by Sundblom Santa
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Nowt wrong with the song, like others have said, its not dark or abusive. Im sure if one wanted to, you could spin the lyrics in any direction your mind chose too 

I choose to simply enjoy what is a Christmas classic. :) 

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If we are going to go after something like this, then we need to remove every nursery rhyme. Take the time to listen to and read the lines to many famous nursery rhymes.  The bow breaks, and baby will fall- isn't this child abuse letting you child be in a crib or carriage where it breaks and the child falls. Then  there is Hansel and Gretel where the witch tries to shove kids into a stove to cook them. Humpty Dumpty and his big fall, I know kids that tried to do this themselves. Does that mean the parents are guilty of child abuse. No it is just a nursery rhyme meant to help with remembering and reciting in kids. London Bridge is Falling down is a reference to a bridge being destroyed in London. Should that be removed so people are not afraid of a bridge collapsing that they travel on? What's in this drink could easily be asking or referring to the recipe of the cider or hot chocolate being consumed. If you want to find something wrong you can with anything. Often it is how you look at something unfortunately, some try to find things that are not really there.

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50 minutes ago, Santa SteveKl said:

If we are going to go after something like this, then we need to remove every nursery rhyme. Take the time to listen to and read the lines to many famous nursery rhymes.  The bow breaks, and baby will fall- isn't this child abuse letting you child be in a crib or carriage where it breaks and the child falls. Then  there is Hansel and Gretel where the witch tries to shove kids into a stove to cook them. Humpty Dumpty and his big fall, I know kids that tried to do this themselves. Does that mean the parents are guilty of child abuse. No it is just a nursery rhyme meant to help with remembering and reciting in kids. London Bridge is Falling down is a reference to a bridge being destroyed in London. Should that be removed so people are not afraid of a bridge collapsing that they travel on? What's in this drink could easily be asking or referring to the recipe of the cider or hot chocolate being consumed. If you want to find something wrong you can with anything. Often it is how you look at something unfortunately, some try to find things that are not really there.

Going down that route, "Little Jack Horner" (eating his Christmas pie) could easily refer to gluttony! 🤣 But seriously, some folks get bent out of shape for no reason. They're demented. Leave them alone. That's the worst punishment available to them (not to correct them, but to leave them to wallow in their own self-made misery).

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