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Found 26 results

  1. stuartdjr

    Youthful Mrs. Claus

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  2. stuartdjr

    Zipper in place

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  3. stuartdjr

    Seated view

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  4. stuartdjr

    Coat hemmed

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    Took coat up 3 inches. Still working on the fur trim. Have zipper and lining to go.

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  5. stuartdjr

    Belt Loop closeup

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  6. stuartdjr

    Belt Loops

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  7. stuartdjr

    Coat first draft

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    The coat was too long. Hemmed it after this photo.

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  8. stuartdjr

    Working

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  9. stuartdjr

    Front fur sewn

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  10. stuartdjr

    Fur laid on top

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  11. stuartdjr

    Fur cut out

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  12. stuartdjr

    Youthful Mrs. Claus

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  13. stuartdjr

    Hood on Robe

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  14. stuartdjr

    Robe Lining

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  15. stuartdjr

    Sewing

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  16. stuartdjr

    Pants

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  17. stuartdjr

    Robe

    From the album: Custom Santa Suit 2019

    © Stuart Deacon Jr.

  18. Mervyn The Hired Hand

    Sunshine and Snow for Santa

    Sunshine Silverheels was a reindeer herder, or more precisely a descendant of reindeer herders, a primitive breed of dog known as a Samoyed. The name Samoyed comes from the Samoyede, a semi-nomadic people from Asia who migrated to Siberia and neighboring Lapland in northern Finland a thousand years ago. They bred dogs for hard work in the coldest habitable places on earth. Samoyeds are substantial but graceful dogs standing anywhere 19 to 24 inches at the shoulder, sometimes running 70 pounds without fat. Powerful, tireless, with a long, thick all-white coat impervious to cold—Samoyeds are beautiful and highly functional. They also have some quirky characteristics. Samoyed fur is sometimes used as an alternative for wool, with a soft texture similar to angora. Samoyed fur sweaters have been reported to handle temperatures well below freezing. Sunshine’s fur made a beautiful scarf and beanie for my wife. The fur is sometimes also used in making artificial flies for fishing. The Samoyede people depended on reindeer as a vital source of food, fur, and leather. At first, they used dogs to hunt reindeer. But in time Samoyede culture shifted from hunting reindeer to herding them. The bold white hunting dogs found a new role as stock dogs, moving and protecting the herds. Early on, the Laplanders found it desirable for their herd dogs to not have a taste for the animals they were protecting, and the diet of Samoyed dogs was shifted to mostly fish. Perhaps as a result, Sunshine could always be found hanging about under foot in the kitchen whenever fish was cooking. And when a can of tuna fish was being opened, Sunshine would come running. Samoyeds are smart, stubborn, social, mischievous dogs who demand love and attention. Often difficult to train, they need a very firm but loving hand in the process. As pack animals, they must learn early who the alpha dog is—and the alpha dog must be their owner. Once that is established, Samoyeds are attentive and eager to learn. Sunshine knew a vocabulary of over 50 human words before he died at 14 years, and was always listening for words like “walk,” and “ride,” and “treat,” among others. He could also tell what one’s plans were for the day by seeing what pants one put on in the morning. Samoyeds proved amenable to herding Santa’s reindeer and small children, but never showed much interest in herding sheep or cattle. Not as fast as a sheltie or Australian shepherd, Samoyeds use their bulk to stand in the way to turn reindeer, and will often play with toddlers by walking with them and turning their paths back and forth across a yard for long periods. Samoyeds are excellent companions, especially for small children or even other dogs, and they remain playful into old age. Known as the smiling sled dog, or “smiley dog,” Samoyeds have a perpetual smile that is both endearing and functional. Upturned corners of the mouth keep Samoyeds from drooling, preventing icicles from forming on the face in arctic weather often 60 degrees blow zero F. When told to smile, Sunshine would obediently come and sit in front of anyone who spoke the command, and stare into their face lovingly, with his white eyelashes and black button nose. Sunshine had copious amounts of hair growing between his toes, long enough to cover the pads of his feet if not trimmed, an adaptation that allows Samoyeds to run long distances on snow and ice without harming their feet. Still, he was fairly comical on occasion when his feet got cold and he began holding them alternately off the ground, especially when he tried to lift a front and rear foot at the same time. Samoyeds also habitually curl their tails on their backs, presumably to keep from dragging them in the snow and ice. When their tail is down, its usually because they are sleepy. Sunshine loved the snow, and would chase snowflakes and try to catch them in his mouth endlessly. The first flake of winter he saw was an especially joyous occasion. He also loved to eat ice cubes and carrots, presumably in part due to the crunchy texture. After one storm, he ate enough 2” hail stones that he began to shiver uncontrollably, and had to be restrained from eating more. Samoyeds know how to pull. An untrained Samoyed may be seen taking its owner for a walk, or perhaps a jog at the end of an extended leash, rather than walking alongside. Samoyeds will pull a skier with enthusiasm all day in a ski-joring harness. Fridtjof Nansen believed that use of sled dogs was the only effective way to explore the north and used Samoyeds on his expeditions in search of Santa and the North Pole. Two Samoyeds, Kaifas and Suggen, were the lead dogs for Nansen's North Pole expedition. He claimed to find the North Pole, but never found Santa, presumably because Santa’s workshop is a magical place that only allows those who should to see it. In his youth, Sunshine briefly thought he could walk on water. As a pup beside a swimming pool, he sniffed a couple times and then blithely stepped off the rim of the pool, only to find he was not after all supernatural, abruptly learning he could swim, at least until pulled from the pool by the scruff of his neck. Then carrying about 10 pounds of additional water weight in his heavy fur, he unsuccessfully tried to shake it off and almost wound up in the pool again. Later, after regaining his composure during a short drive, he picked up a large chew stick and posed for the camera like Edward G. Robinson enjoying a cigar. Although pups don’t care much, adult Samoyeds are a bit vain about their appearance after a bath, often hiding behind a chair or couch for awhile until they dry out. But baths are rare, because a light oil in a Samoyed’s fur encourages dirt to fall off when it dries dry—they are very clean dogs. When they feel threatened, they can puff out their fur so they look about twice as big as they really are, especially around their face and ruff. When Sunshine met a huge statute of the White Horse Whisky horsed along the Trans-Canadian Highway, he woofed his way around it with his ruff as large as a lion, until convinced it wasn't going to step on him. Some say Samoyeds' friendly disposition makes them poor guard dogs; an aggressive Samoyed is rare. But they are excellent watchdogs, and will bark at anything that encroaches on their territory, unless trained not to do so. And my spouse maintains the walking down the street with a Samoyed is one of the most secure feelings one can have, as they look larger than they actually are. Surely this must be the ideal dog for Santa Claus: friendly, loves snow, small children, and reindeer, smiles all the time, loves to pull sleds, eats fish and can keep a secret. Santa would be hard pressed to find a better candidate to keep his toes warm under the desk on those cold arctic nights.
  19. Mervyn The Hired Hand

    Santa’s Farm Dog

    My mother’s father was a wiry old cuss, more elf than Santa but for one thing: he was a story teller. I guess he had to be, raising ten kids on an old dairy farm in the rocky hillsides of middle upstate New York during the Great Depression. He had an amazing ability to sit down with children and spin a bedtime story out of thin air on the spur of the moment, sometimes starting with something mundane that had happened the same day, but never telling the same story twice. We kids were spellbound as we listened quietly—probably the only quiet time during the day—to Granddad tell his bedtime tales. Ah, what I would give for a book of those stories today! This was no sentimental softy charming the children. He had a grip of iron when he squeezed your knee, and his word was law when settling squabbles. He had been a lumberjack, a plumber, a furniture re-upholsterer, and eventually a dairy farmer to feed his kids while others stood in bread lines. Skinny as a rail and tough as nails, none of my larger uncles would stand up to him. But he had a soft spot for kids, and an imagination to rival Mother Goose. He also had an old red dog named Fritz. Nobody knew what kind of dog Fritz was, but he was about the size of a border collie, covered head to toe with long rusty red hair, and his tail held up like a flag. This was a farm dog: twice a day Granddad would make a small hand motion telling Fritz to go get the cows. That sleepy red dog would suddenly tear out of the yard like a tornado, streaking down the hill, across the creek and up through a distant pasture. A half hour later, he’d bring 60 dairy cows slowly into the barn for milking. Fritz was an amazing dog, quick to find the cows, but never rushing them to the barn, so they never lost their milk. And he never left one out to pasture, bringing in every stray. One cold, stormy Christmas Eve, Granddad told a bedtime story about his forgetting the cows had been shut in the barn all day due to the weather, and sending Fritz out to bring them in for milking by mistake. Fritz was off like a flash, skidding around the corner of the barn to find the cows. He was gone an unusually long time. After awhile, Granddad remembered the cows were still in the barn. He began to wonder what was taking Fritz so long to figure it out and started milking, when suddenly there was a loud commotion at the barn door, which remained open about a foot. Granddad looked up to find a mob of every goose, chicken and barn cat on the farm squeezing through the door opening, carefully herded by that red dog Fritz. Not finding any cows in the pasture, Fritz had done the best he could, bringing everything else he could find into the barn. Apparently Fritz had a rather strong herding instinct, and wanted everyone to be included. We kids all laughed and marveled at this story of the red dog with a determined but gentle Christmas spirit. Then we went quietly to bed.
  20. Mervyn The Hired Hand

    Uncle Paul Santa Saves Christmas

    Over the river and through the woods to grandmother’s house we went as children on Christmas day, after opening stockings and an early breakfast at home. Grandma’s house was about 50 miles away on a small dairy farm in the hills of southern upstate New York near Binghampton. Five kids with parents in an old station wagon would sing Christmas carols at the top of our lungs most of the way there until we ran out of songs, sometimes singing the same ones more than once. Those were happy days. Jingle Bells was popular. I recall one Christmas close to 65 years ago when I was about 7, my older sister 10, and our younger siblings 5, 4 and 2, when and the snow was fresh and deep as we reached Grandpa’s hill maybe a mile from the farm, and slowly slipped off the unplowed dirt road into a drift covering a ditch in a shower of snow. This was before cell phones and my father had to walk some ways down a side road to a neighbor’s house to call my Uncle Paul for help. After he returned, telling us help was on the way, we sat in the car as it got colder and waited what seemed like forever, anxious children day dreaming about a second set of stockings hung by the chimney with care. The singing had stopped as we watched the top of the hill, expecting an old red farm truck to come and pull us out of two feet of fresh snow. The stillness of new fallen snow surrounding us was suddenly broken by the sounds of a vehicle laboring up the other side of the hill until, low and behold, here came Santa in red costume driving a large old green tractor over the hill, waving hello! At first too far away to see clearly, it was my Uncle Paul, a usually taciturn lifelong bachelor nearly as wide as he was tall, dressed as Santa with barn boots on, coming to our rescue in what appeared to us kids to be a Christmas miracle. Imagine what a vision he was to us through foggy windows, driving that old tractor down the hill, pulling us out of the ditch, and towing the car the rest of the way over the hill to Grandma’s house. He reveled in it, every few minutes turning that broad back in the tractor seat and waving with a loud “Ho, ho, ho” all the way to a happy second breakfast in the woods, on a day us kids would remember the rest of our lives. He was so into the spirit of the holiday, we’ll never forget.
  21. Name: Little Wings Category: Events and Get Togethers Date Added: 2018-12-29 Submitter: DeputyDogRick The last two years I have appeared with the Adaptive Ballet in Milford, Ct and it has become one of the most endearing events of the Season. I hope all of your seasons were Merry and Bright Little Wings
  22. DeputyDogRick

    Little Wings

    The last two years I have appeared with the Adaptive Ballet in Milford, Ct and it has become one of the most endearing events of the Season. I hope all of your seasons were Merry and Bright
  23. Ol Santa

    My Freckles

    My Freckles Anytime you’re in the big chair and have children climbing up and down over your lap all day, you can get pretty tired or you can simply have a ball. Well last night after I had gotten into bed, my mind reflected back to an incident that occurred with a little boy in the first grade a couple of years ago. It probably sounded something like this to his Mom who was sitting in one of the chairs provided by the Shopping Center to accommodate parents while waiting their child visits with Santa. Santa: “Well hello my little man, how are you today?” Boy: “Awh, I’m okay I guess,” replied the youngster. Santa: “Well, you certainly don’t sound very happy about it, so what’s the problem?” Boy: “Nothin’, I’m just not happy,” was the reply. Santa: “You have every reason in the world to be happy, what with Christmas just being a few days away, and being out of school for a couple of weeks, and a big dinner on . Christmas day and the toys and all, why aren’t you happy?” Boy: “Oh, you wouldn’t understand,” he said. Santa: “Well, you know the place to start is always at the beginning, right?” was my reply. Boy: “I’d just rather not talk about it,” he said. Santa: “You do know there are other children waiting, so we need to get started on what it is that you want for Christmas pretty quick,” I said. Boy: In a much quieter voice than before he said “It’s just these freckles.” Santa: “Well what’s wrong with your freckles…they look just fine to me. They go real well with that sandy colored hair you got that’s combed so nicely,” I replied. Boy: In the same subdued voice the he said, “The kids all tease me about these freckles.” Santa: “Well I suppose that’s because they aren’t fortunate enough to have any of their own freckles,” I said. Boy: The youngster gave me a questioning look and said, “Fortunate?” Santa: “Oh, sure. Lots of famous people have had freckles. Why there have been Kings and Queens and Presidents and Generals and Movie Stars and lots of other famous people from all walks of life. Many have had freckles,” was my reply. Boy: A smile began to appear on his face and then he asked, “Santa, just name me one real person that you know who has freckles?” Santa: “What do you want to know that for,” I asked. Boy: “I wanta’ be able to name somebody that they know about to prove it to ‘em,” was his immediate reply. Santa: My answer to his question brought a full grin to the boys face as I said, “Well, what would you think if I told you that I have freckles, and so does Mrs. Claus. Boy: Looking intently into my face he said, “I don’t see any freckles!” Santa: With a big grin, I pulled up one fur cuff and then the other as he scanned my forearms and then he began rubbing them. As he gazed at my LIVER SPOTS . (from aging…I’ll be 86 in April), I looked at his Mom as she covered her smile with her hands. Then I told him, You see, as people get old up at the North Pole, that . sometimes their skin stretches and sags and that’s what happened to me.” Boy: “Wow! Wait ‘til the other kids hear about all those famous people with freckles,” he exclaimed. The boy, with a huge grin on his face, leaped off my lap, rushed over to Santa’s Toy Boxes, picked out the toy he wanted as his Mother paid for the photo’s. Then, together, hand in hand they walked out of Santa Land with big smiles on their faces. As a Side Note; That same year after that occurrence, several children asked if they could see “The freckles on my arms.” Actually, I believe there may have some bullting going on because the boys mom, as she got up to leave grabbed my arm and said, "Thank you Santa. That's been something that's been bothering him every since school started. We're new to this school District this year!" Does anyone ever ask you if being a Santa is fun? Ol’ Santa (True Story!)
  24. Holly Claus

    Mom & Kim

    From the album: Holly's Gallery

  25. Santa  Kevin

    Kris Kringle and Holly Claus

    From the album: Kris Kringle Kevin #1

    Love is in The Air!! Photo by: David J. Montgomery, Our Official Photographer

    © House Call Santa, LLC. 2017

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